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Lessons in Positive Psychology, the MPR.

Metaphoric Positive Reframe,

A technique for the entrepreneurs, positive leaders or anyone interested in positive psychology.

 

Have you ever wondered what other people or perhaps society thinks about your strengths? For about $15USD you can complete your own Gullups Strength Finder assessment and be given a breakdown of each of your 5 key strengths.

Recently I reflected on my Strength Finder results. My no.1 strength was Positivity. It made me wonder how can I share it in a much better way than simply a motivational quote by someone famous, put over someone else’s photograph 🙂

From that, I figured that if I could share with you one of the most powerful techniques or strategies, perhaps you can gain a lot more positivity naturally in your own life. However this technique is not limited to simply positivity. It can also assist with cleansing, mindfulness, relaxing, even productivity.

The technique that you are about to learn I’ve called the “Metaphoric Positive Reframe” or MPR.

Anyone can learn to do a MPR and the real big bonus is that this is something that is easily turned into a habit.

Let’s get into it:I remember my first real paid job. I was 14yrs old and the job was on a farm. It was physically really hard work. In fact my boss actually paid me adult wages because it was so tough. And there I was starting my weekend or school holiday on the farm from 6.30am.

The work was as hard as manual labour can get. Naturally I wanted to give up. I hated the heat, the sun, the sweat rolling into my eyes. I couldn’t wait till sunset, but it’s only the early hours in of the day.

In this time I went through numerous psychological processes as one would naturally do. I tried singing to myself. Focusing on what I could buy. Calculating how much money I already earned or would earn. Thinking about other things. None of it really worked for more than a few minutes. But this work went on throughout the whole summer.

In time I created a strategy which was amazing simple and effective. I started to look at things differently. This is what people consider hard work. I’m doing it. I’m succeeding. I can do it. As much as I didn’t like it, the work became symbolic.

This work was making me tougher. This work was helping me become a ‘hard worker’. The farm itself became part of me. As I worked on the farm I was working on my self. I was employed, earning and saving, just as the farm was employing, earning and saving. The work became less about a job and it became part of my development as a young man.

Every time I went to work, I said things to myself like, “I’m building my character. I’m building my empire”. Sometimes I would even repeat this like a mantra.

“I’m building my character. I’m building my empire”.

“I’m building my character. I’m building my empire”.

“I’m building my character. I’m building my empire”.

 

Another example

A lot of great things come out of South Korea. Gangnam Style or Kimchi may come to mind for you. However personally for me it would be memories of a week in the area of Noonsan learning Maum Meditation. Here they were very clued on to the MPR. They just didn’t call it that.

Students reaching higher levels in their practice would be ‘blessed’ with the option of doing chores like serving food or doing the dishes (for the entire meditation centre). Each of these tasks were given deeper meaning. Washing plates, could be experienced as washing away bad habits. Scraping leftover food into compost bins could be experienced as feeding the garden. Students learned to reframe the task and actually enjoy it. It goes to show that:

  • You can do a MPR on any task.
  • You can turn your whole life into a collection of positive rituals and habits with the MPR method.

Examples of specific MPR’s:

Having a shower, bathing or washing dishes:

Washing away the stress, cleansing, purifying.

Releasing negative thoughts from the mind.

I purify my thoughts and clean my mind to be more successful.

Turning on power, fan or light switches:

Control, ability, influence, helping others

I’m able to positively influence my environment.

I’m in control of my life.

I connect with that which I need to make my body and those around more healthy and comfortable

Waking up:

Realization, waking up, recognition.

I awaken to greater opportunities for success and abundance

I awaken grateful to have slept and appreciate the opportunity to be here today

 

 

How can you do this?

 

1. Pick a regular task. Showering, brushing teeth, cleaning, putting on make up, shaving, catching a subway, riding a bike, setting your daily alarm.

 

2. Picking a symbolic meaning behind each task. Cleansing, being alive, positive energy, revitalizing, recharging, motivating, contributing.

 

3. Create a physical reminder to do the MPR when you do the task. For example, put a note on the mirror, a rubber band around a shampoo bottle, a sticker on your bike.

 

4. Write out your intent, and your mantra. Writing it down makes it planned and repetitive.

Write out your intent: “When I set my alarm, I will stop worrying about the day, I will put the day behind me and rest”.

Write out your mantra: “I’ve put my day behind me, and will enjoy resting now.”

 

5. Consciously or out nice and loud repeat your mantra at least 3 times while you do the task.

 

6. Bask in the glory. Yes, I’m doing this! By actually doing this, you are in fact succeeding and adding growth to your day naturally.

 

 

 

Imagine for a minute.

What could happen, if you applied the MPR for just 3 routine mundane tasks?

 

Created and written by Adrian Cahill. Adrian is committed to Positive Psychology in Townsville Australia and throughout Asia.

He is an Executive Coach working predominantly over the phone/Skype with clients across the globe.

One thought on “Lessons in Positive Psychology, the MPR.

  1. I loved you experiences with Metaphoric Positive Reframe and how helped you when you were young, I am going to apply the 6 steps immediately to my own life. Thanks again for this valuable articles

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